12-20 July 2017
BEXCO
Asia/Seoul timezone
Home > Timetable > Session details > Contribution details

Contribution

BEXCO - Room F(201/202/203/204)

[CRD116] The SiRO Detector (Silicone Read Out) for cosmic muon flux-trajectory measurements

Speakers

  • Bogdan MITRICA

Primary authors

Co-authors

  • Andreea MUNTEANU (Horia Hulubei National Institute for R&D in Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH))
  • Alexandru BALACEANU (Horia Hulubei National Institute for R&D in Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH))
  • Alexandra SAFTOIU (Horia Hulubei National Institute for R&D in Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH))
  • Hermann-Josef MATHES (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institut f¨ur Kernphysik, 76021 Karlsruhe, Germany)
  • Andreas HAUNGS (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institut f¨ur Kernphysik, 76021 Karlsruhe, Germany)
  • Alexandru GHERGHEL-LASCU (Horia Hulubei National Institute for R&D in Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH))
  • Denis STANCA (Horia Hulubei National Institute for R&D in Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH))
  • Iliana BRANCUS (Horia Hulubei National Institute for R&D in Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH))
  • Toma MOSU (Horia Hulubei National Institute for R&D in Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH))

Description

SiRO is a detector measuring the flux and trajectory of cosmic muons, based on plastic scintillators, optical fibers (wavelength shifters) and readout by SiPM(MPPC-Multi Pixel Photon Counter) devices. The Detector is consisting of a stack of 6 active layers, grouped by 2 for determining the muon trajectories through 3 planes. One module has 24 plastic scintillators stripes with 2 fiber mounted on each stripe, readout by 24 MPPC devices. Active surface is 1m x 1m . The acquisition system is capable of tracking trajectories in real time. Such a detector is used to measure muon flux at ground level or underground for studying the possibility to detect unknown cavities in the old mining sites (ex: Slanic Prahova - Romania). Such muon flux measurements could be also used for geological studies, e.g. to explore variations in the rock density and composition above the observation level.