12-20 July 2017
BEXCO
Asia/Seoul timezone
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Contribution

BEXCO - Room D(109/110)

[NU087] Search for correlations in the arrival directions of astrophysical neutrino candidates and ultra-high energy cosmic rays

Speakers

  • Imen AL SAMARAI

Primary authors

Co-authors

  • Lisa SCHUMACHER (RWTH Aachen University, III. Physikalisches Institut B., Aachen, Germany)
  • Asen CHRISTOV (Département de physique nucléaire et corpusculaire, Université de Genève, Geneva, Switzerland)
  • Teresa MONTARULI (Département de physique nucléaire et corpusculaire, Université de Genève, Geneva, Switzerland)
  • Imen AL SAMARAI (Département de physique nucléaire et corpusculaire, Université de Genève, Switzerland)
  • Peter TINYAKOV (Service de Physique Théorique, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium)
  • Piera L. GHIA (Institut de Physique Nucléaire d'Orsay (IPNO), Université Paris-Sud, Univ. Paris/Saclay, CNRS-IN2P3, France)
  • Lorenzo CACCIANIGA (Università di Milano, Dipartimento di Fisica, Italy)
  • Hiroyuki SAGAWA (Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba, Japan)
  • Ugo GIACCARI (Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Fisíca, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil)

Description

High-energy neutrinos, being neutral and weakly interacting particles, are powerful probes into the sites of production and acceleration of cosmic rays. Overcoming the challenges of their detection, the discovery of cosmic neutrinos by the IceCube Collaboration has moved the field one step closer to realizing the potential of neutrino astronomy. Meanwhile, ground-based cosmic-ray detectors like the Pierre Auger Observatory and Telescope Array have reached an unprecedented accuracy in the determination of the features of the cosmic rays at the highest energies. We report on a collaborative effort between IceCube, the Pierre Auger Observatory and Telescope Array to identify directional correlations between the arrival directions of the highest-energy cosmic rays from both hemispheres, and that of the most probable cosmic neutrino events detected by IceCube. We describe two independent search methods and present the updated results using seven years of IceCube neutrino data and the most energetic cosmic-ray events detected by the Pierre Auger Observatory and Telescope Array.